4 days in North Yorkshire Itinerary

4 days in North Yorkshire Itinerary

Created using Inspirock North Yorkshire journey planner
Make it your trip
Drive
1
York
Drive
2
Pickering
— 3 nights
Drive

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York

Situated on the confluence of the rivers Ouse and Foss, York has witnessed an abundance of major political events throughout its two millennia of existence.
Your day by day itinerary now includes York Shambles as well as GR8escape York. Start off your visit on the 4th (Fri): take a stroll through York Shambles and then test your team's savvy at GR8escape York.

To find traveler tips, more things to do, other places to visit, and more tourist information, refer to the York trip itinerary app.

Burton upon Trent to York is an approximately 2-hour car ride. You can also take a train; or drive; or do a combination of train and bus. In January, daytime highs in York are 7°C, while nighttime lows are 1°C. Finish up your sightseeing early on the 4th (Fri) so you can go by car to Pickering.
Neighborhoods · Shopping · Fun & Games
Find places to stay Jan 4 — 5:

Pickering — 3 nights

Your day by day itinerary now includes Eden Camp Modern History Museum, Cropton Brewery and Pickering Castle. Keep things going the next day: indulge your thirst for a good beer at Cropton Brewery and then explore the historical opulence of Pickering Castle.

To find more things to do, photos, ratings, and more tourist information, use the Pickering trip builder tool.

Drive from York to Pickering in an hour. Alternatively, you can drive; or take a bus. January in Pickering sees daily highs of 7°C and lows of 1°C at night. You'll have a few hours on the 7th (Mon) to wrap things up before traveling home.
Museums · Breweries & Distilleries · Historic Sites
Side Trip
Find places to stay Jan 4 — 7:

North Yorkshire travel guide

4.2
Specialty Museums · History Museums · Churches
North Yorkshire is one of England’s most rural areas, yet its biggest attraction is a city. York, the county’s largest town, is an ancient urban settlement dating back to before the Roman era. The city is known for containing some of the best-preserved historical buildings and structures in Europe, and it's one of the most visited cities in England, second only to London. Virtually untouched by the effects of the Industrial Revolution, which left other regions scarred by crumbling factories and run-down mills, this county is dotted by historic stately houses and the remains of formerly wealthy abbeys. Several breezy seaside resorts line the coastline, where you can trade in the sightseeing overload of London for a more relaxing holiday. For a truly English experience, make sure your itinerary includes a few tours of the county’s villages, renowned for their well-manicured gardens and thriving production of world-class cheeses.