Colegio de San Gregorio, Valladolid

5.0
#9 of 17 in Museums in Valladolid
Art Museum · Hidden Gem · History Museum
Create an itinerary including Colegio de San Gregorio
The Colegio de San Gregorio is an Isabelline style building located in the city of Valladolid, in Castile and León, Spain, it was formerly a college and now is housing the Museo Nacional de Escultura museum. This building is one of the best examples of the architectural style known as Isabelline, which is the characteristic architectural style of the Crown of Castile region during the Catholic Monarchs' reign (late-15th century to early-16th century).

Among other sections highlights its courtyard and its facade for its refined decoration, elegant proportions and the number of symbologies. It was founded as a teaching institution. Aimed at College of Theology for Dominican friars, it has acquired a doctrinal authority and acted as a spiritual and political hotbed in the Central region of Spain's Renaissance and Baroque periods.
Arrange to visit Colegio de San Gregorio and other attractions in Valladolid using our Valladolid trip maker.
Source
Create a full itinerary - for free!

Colegio de San Gregorio reviews

Rate this attraction
TripAdvisor traveler rating
TripAdvisor traveler rating 5.0
35 reviews
Google
5.0
TripAdvisor
  • This is a school from the 15th century. The facade was designed by the famous architect Gil de Siloe. The facade has the images of the Catholic King and Queen, Ferdinand and Isabella. Nowadays, it.....  more
    This is a school from the 15th century. The facade was designed by the famous architect Gil de Siloe. The facade has the images of the Catholic King and Queen, Ferdinand and Isabella. Nowadays, it.....  more »
  • Totally fabulous, just €3 to get in. Lots of great religious art and a superb audio guide for an extra €2. I spent a couple of hours here. Can't recommend it highly enough. 
    Totally fabulous, just €3 to get in. Lots of great religious art and a superb audio guide for an extra €2. I spent a couple of hours here. Can't recommend it highly enough.  more »
Google
  • The condensed ornamentation of its Spanish-Flemish façade, attributed to Gil de Siloé, has been the subject of numerous interpretative controversies. Just above the door you can see the founder, Fray Alonso de Burgos, making an offering to San Gregorio before San Pablo and Santo Domingo. The fleur de lis, emblem of this friar, who wanted to leave his mark on the building; it is repeated ad nauseam throughout the façade, but also in the courtyard, on the staircase and in the original coffered ceilings that the museum rooms preserve. In the upper body there is a fountain -eternal youth?- from which a pomegranate tree sprouts -tree of wisdom or symbol of the conquest of Granada?- that shelters the coat of arms of the Catholic Monarchs. A pomegranate appears in it, which indicates that the Nasrid kingdom had already been taken, unlike the coats of arms that are engraved in the inner courtyard, therefore, prior to 1492. Curious, without a doubt, are the savages that appear on both sides, and that have given rise to different interpretations. Do they represent pure man in nature? Are they alluding to the custom of dressing up squires as savages at parties? Or are they simply gatekeepers? In the tall bodies, these figures have a more humanized appearance, without hair and some even without a beard: they are the first representations of the American Indians. Let's not forget that the Valladolid Controversy took place here, an intense moral debate about whether or not the inhabitants of the New World had a soul. We challenge you to find the snail that brings good luck. Source: "discover Valladolid"

Plan your trip to Valladolid

  • Get a personalized trip
    A full day by day itinerary based on your preferences
  • Customize it
    Refine your trip. We'll find the
    best routes and schedules
  • Book it
    Choose from the best hotels and activities. Up to 50% off
  • Manage it
    Everything in one place. Everyone on the same page.