Tmogvi Fortress, Tmogvi

4.4
#9 of 13 in Historic Sites in Samtskhe-Javakheti Region
Ruin · Hidden Gem · Historic Site
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Tmogvi Fortress reviews

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  • The Tmogvi Fortress is not easy to reach (15 min from the village by car, 4x4 recommended - or 25 min walk... :-) ) but it definitely worth. We didn't know much about it, just heard that there are... 
    The Tmogvi Fortress is not easy to reach (15 min from the village by car, 4x4 recommended - or 25 min walk... :-) ) but it definitely worth. We didn't know much about it, just heard that there are...  more »
  • Visit here cant be compared to the visit to more maintained and younger Khertvisi fortress which is more boring from inside. From here you can reach the best views of the gorge - follow dirt road... 
    Visit here cant be compared to the visit to more maintained and younger Khertvisi fortress which is more boring from inside. From here you can reach the best views of the gorge - follow dirt road...  more »
Google
  • The Tmogvi Fortress is not easy to reach (15 min by car [4x4 recommended] or 25 min by walk) but definitely worth it! One of the most beautiful view have ever seen! On a painting I would say the artist pushed it a bit too far such a beautiful composition does not exist in reality - but if you are there you must accept that, nevertheless, yet there is... ;-)
  • Tmogvi (Georgian: თმოგვი [tʰmɔgvi]; is a ruined fortress and medieval town in the southern Georgian region of Samtskhe-Javakheti, on the left bank of the Kura River, a few kilometers downstream of the cave city of Vardzia. The name "Tmogvi" is derived from Georgian word mogvi (მოგვი), meaning "pagan priest" or "magus".[1] The fortress is first mentioned in sources from the 9th century.[1] It was built as a defensive work controlling the ancient trade route between the Javakheti plateau and the gorge of Kura, over a gorge formed by the Kura River. It was a crucial military stronghold in the region of Javakheti. The feudal lords of the region were at that time the Bagratids, the Georgian branch. The Georgian chronicles report numerous attempts to take the castle over, but they were rarely successful.[2] Tmogvi gained importance after the neighboring town and fortress of Tsunda was ruined around 900 AD. In 914 Yusuf ibn Abi'l-Saj approached Tmogvi, but retreated without an attempt to capture it. This was the first mention of the fortress in the chronicles. By the beginning of the 11th century, the fortress had passed under the direct control of the unified Kingdom of Georgia. The second mention is connected with this period, when the country was ruled by Bagrat III. The king imprisoned two rulers of the duchy of Klarjeti, Sumbat III and his brother Gurgen, in the fortress.[3] In 1073, it was given in apanage to the nobleman Niania Kuabulisdze; his descendants kept it in the following centuries, before it passed to other major feudal families such as the Toreli, the Tmogveli, the Shalikashvili or the Jaqeli. In 1088, the fortress collapsed in the first devastating earthquake, when its ruler Kakhaber and his wife both died. In 1191, the fortress was gifted to Sargis-Mkhargrdzeli by Queen Tamar. Mkhargrdzeli ruled in Tmogvi for a century. The most famous among them, Sargis Tmogveli was also a writer and poet, and phylosopher. The town was restored and blossomed, after it was destroyed again in the second earthquake of 1283. The third earthquake of 1319 destroyed Tmogvi again. It was restored during the rule of Murvan Katkhaidze by architect Theodor. The medieval Georgian writer Sargis Tmogveli was from Tmogvi. Shalikashvili family were the last rulers of the fortress in the 16th century. Ottoman Empire gained control of the fortress in 1578. In 1829, the Treaty of Adrianople transferred the fortress, among with the surrounding region, to the Russian Empire

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